Pebble Watch

EMAIL AND ALERTS

I’m not a big fan of watches but I may have to pick one of these guys up. Connecting via Bluetooth to your iPhone it gets all kinds of nifty information from your phone and the internet depending on the apps you install to the device.

Pebble can receive simple alerts and notifications from if this then that (ifttt.com) More adventurous developers can use the Pebble SDK, with its Arduino-like abstractions and simple C structure, to gain full control of the watch.

Watchfaces

I should have taken advantage when the Pebble was on Kickstarter they were hoping to raise $100,000 for production and ended up with over $10 Million. By backing them with $99 you essentially preordered a Jet Black watch. If you’d like to pre-order one now you can do so on http://getpebble.com/ but it’s going to cost you $150

The watch allows you to view Incoming Caller ID information, emails, calendar alerts, Facebook messages, Twitter notifications and more.

No tips yet.
Be the first to tip!

Like this post? Tip with bitcoin!

16msbd8d4hW9CCBJtC6rMSUmaKRTpeS68E

If you enjoyed reading this post, please consider tipping me using Bitcoin. Each post gets its own unique Bitcoin address so by tipping you're not only making my continued efforts possible but telling me what you liked.

WordPress XSS Vulnerability

If you’re a WordPress blogger be sure to update to the latest 3.0.4 build as soon as possible, While no new features have been fixed a major security hole has been patched.
Basicly 3.0.3 allows users to insert comments with malicious code, the 3.0.3 WordPress only sanitizes lowercase HTML allowing a malicious user to pass bad code to obtain cookies of a logged in user.

For now if your still running 3.0.3 check all pending and new comments for base 64 code or JavaScript links and if you see some delete the comment right away.

See http://wordpress.org/ for the complete announcement from the wordpress team.

No tips yet.
Be the first to tip!

Like this post? Tip with bitcoin!

1FRxrBB6wQHQGRLHWZ3xjhJY1XT9WimVxw

If you enjoyed reading this post, please consider tipping me using Bitcoin. Each post gets its own unique Bitcoin address so by tipping you're not only making my continued efforts possible but telling me what you liked.

Hide WordPress Stats Smilie

If you use the WordPress Stats plugin, you may have noticed the smilie added at the bottom of the page. The plugin itself offers no way to remove the smilie, and is actually required for the plugin to function properly. I myself use the service to keep tabs on traffic to my site.

However not all users myself included like seeing the little graphic in the bottom corner of the page, but just because its needed doesn’t mean you have to see it. Using a little CSS trickery we can hide the graphic from the user. Simply toss the following line in the bottom of your stylesheet and while the image will still be loaded it will be hidden from view, keeping the plugin functioning as it should.

img#wpstats{width:0px;height:0px;padding:0px;border:none;overflow:hidden}

No tips yet.
Be the first to tip!

Like this post? Tip with bitcoin!

1H8WRv8WQDQs712dyAqYToT8tT7HKmrYbJ

If you enjoyed reading this post, please consider tipping me using Bitcoin. Each post gets its own unique Bitcoin address so by tipping you're not only making my continued efforts possible but telling me what you liked.

WordPress 3.0 Release Candidate

WordPress is aiming for a June release of the 3.0 version of there popular blogging software. So far they are right on track, they just released the first RC of the 3.0 platform, whats an RC? The term release candidate (RC) refers to a version with potential to be a final product, ready to release unless fatal bugs emerge. In this stage of product stabilization, all product features have been designed, coded and tested through one or more beta cycles with no known showstopper-class bug.

If your a WordPress developer or even just a WordPress blogger and want to get a peak at the new version you can head over to WordPress.org and download the new RC, DO NOT install this on your live blog, remember its only a candidate for the new version, further testing still needs to be done to ensure all bugs have been discovered and removed.

If your curious whats been changed heres a quick list.

  • Custom menus.
  • Multi-site. (run multiple blog’s off a single install)
  • The look of the WordPress admin has been lightened up a little bit, so you can focus more on your content.
  • There are a ton of changes, so plugin authors, please test your plugins now, so that if there is a compatibility issue, we can figure it out before the final release.
  • Plugin and theme *users* are also encouraged to test things out. If you find problems, let your plugin/theme authors know so they can figure out the cause.
  • There are a couple of known issues.

If you do decide to give RC1 a test spin and come across any bugs please help WordPress out.

Download WordPress 3.0 RC1

No tips yet.
Be the first to tip!

Like this post? Tip with bitcoin!

1JxwyK8BtVJbHmAD6GEfp1dHneqCJeL2xn

If you enjoyed reading this post, please consider tipping me using Bitcoin. Each post gets its own unique Bitcoin address so by tipping you're not only making my continued efforts possible but telling me what you liked.

Using Secure Passwords.

Everyone has to use them; they protect our privacy so when it comes to something that grants access to things like bank accounts and private files why risk it?

Working in the IT field I can’t tell you how often I see passwords such as “123456” or “Password1” when a good password should never be a sequence of numbers or something based on a word found in the dictionary.

In fact when the application developer RockYou’s login credentials were left exposed because of a SQL injection bug  in RockYou’s website the top 10 passwords  used were listed as the following:

  1. 123456
  2. 12345
  3. 123456789
  4. Password
  5. iloveyou
  6. princess
  7. rockyou
  8. 1234567
  9. 12345678
  10. abc123

A good password should be something along the lines of “7ufebuHU” hard to remember? Yes it is but its also hard to guess and not going to be cracked in a dictionary based attack. If you really hate remembering passwords grab some kind of password database application, never settle for storing your passwords in a text or word document. I personally use 1Password (Mac Only) at home because it offers the ability to sync with the 1Password companion app on the iPhone. It also stores my passwords using AES the same encryption algorithm used as the national standard in the United States, 1Password uses 128-bit keys to encrypt your passwords. Which basically means it would take years to decrypt your data using a brute force attack, negate this altogether by changing your master password every few months.

If you don’t want to fork out any cash for a good password database, then check out KeePass which is a free alternative, which also offers encryption. A nice future the KeePass team came up with, if you don’t want to even remember the one password to decrypt your password database is the use of keyfiles, you can toss the keyfile on a flash drive and keep it with you while leaving the password database one your computer, to decrypt the database to retrieve your passwords simply plug in the flash drive and point the KeePass application at the keyfile.

With both of the above applications you can copy the passwords directly to your clipboard to paste in whatever application you need, and both also have the ability to clear your clipboard after a set number of seconds. KeePass even has the ability to automatically clear the clipboard as soon as you paste it.

So now if you’re going to store everything in the password there is no need to keep them simple, both programs offer you the ability to generate random passwords. If you don’t have ether application handy and need to generate a password, you can use a nifty tool up at the PC tools page to generate up to 50 passwords all at once.

The moral of the posts is that by making a little effort at using a secure password makes a big difference at keeping prying eyes out of your private information.

Also as a final note, looks like 1Password has already made plans and released Mockups for the iPad Interface =) I’m looking foward to that release.

No tips yet.
Be the first to tip!

Like this post? Tip with bitcoin!

1N546cNnS7iyNiDBaJKBKHByJhqSJiqs64

If you enjoyed reading this post, please consider tipping me using Bitcoin. Each post gets its own unique Bitcoin address so by tipping you're not only making my continued efforts possible but telling me what you liked.